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Home Model Engine Machinist > The Tools and Tips > Tools > Myford ML4 lead screw and feed

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Old 05-19-2017, 09:22 PM   #11
fcheslop
 
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Well that will keep both of you out of mischief
There must be thousands of those old mag spanners rusting in peace around the world.
Now youve got me wondering where I last left my set as Im sure the prince of darkness has struck again on the Royal oil field


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Old 05-19-2017, 09:36 PM   #12
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Just a thought on the plastic cover, its not those pop type ones is it? A lot of cars and othe bits and bobs use them now, there like a stud with a tapered end and split in two, so the prongs spring out when the fastener is pressed into the hole. Sorry no idea of the name. They are reusable for cars with the centre been a plastic stud that when pulled out allows the tabs to be clamped together with a pair of pliers and pulled through?? As I said just a thought, if that fails try Frazers method and swear more at it


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Old 05-19-2017, 10:38 PM   #13
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Jon
The plastic cover is the shell for a Castel Garden Xe70 sit on lawn mower. It covers the whole gubbins underneath and this damned cable is to engage what could be a crash gear box except that there ain't no gears. Sort of like the good old days when one did racing changes. I passed my test on a 1938 Morris 8 and my motor bike one on a Silent LE Velocette.

Frazer is right about corroded Maggie spanners.

Theoretically it should be Metric and 5.5 mm Across flats- but it aint. I cannot get a grip and it's only into plastic.

I'm 'old school' and there are no modern plastic turnbuttons.

The next gripping or non gripping episode is to follow. I Keep saying 'BA' or British Association and wonder why?

Norm
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Old 05-20-2017, 09:52 PM   #14
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Jon, Iv sent you part of an email from Sandy about the screw pitch and dial error.Will you please confirm receipt to steambod on the toy forum
cheers
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Old 05-21-2017, 08:13 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fcheslop View Post
Jon, Iv sent you part of an email from Sandy about the screw pitch and dial error.Will you please confirm receipt to steambod on the toy forum
cheers
As an addition about feed screws on the Myford ML4, there is a an article in Model Engineer of 1989(?) from the late David Lammas who restored a friend's ML. It covered initially 'doing the bed' but went on to renew the feed screws etc. Maybe the local Society or readers here will have copies.

Again, I recall Martin Cleeve writing up on feed screws and threads. Again, the series of articles is 'Gold Dust' to someone who has the older Myford.

Somewhere else in ME is the article on the fabricated fixed steady ostensibly for his later ML7 but has working dimensions for his earlier machine.

I had to scrap my copies being threatened with legal action from the then new owners of Model Engineer!

Probably why I don't take or publish photos

Norm
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Old 05-21-2017, 09:56 AM   #16
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Jon

Whilst awaiting the arrival of 'Les Enfants Terrible' and their 'Les Enfants Terrible', I was scratting about having found two zinc alloy castings from some Myford or other. The dials were cast with 100 divisions and could only have some later Myford.

So I went back to the French site and found that the early Myfords had NO dials. So I'm in a quandary as to what you have on your machine. The easiest way is to find out what threads are there.

Mine are classically modified to be 'zeroed' apart from two vertical slides being on no importance.
So what Verniers- and chop/grind the jaws are my thoughts in the absence of dials? Frankly, I would adopt a couple of these cheap Chinese and chop the jaws off. So the lathe could be brought into the 21st century and be able to use metric and imperial dimensions.

Sorry to ramble on a bit but hope that it helps

Norm

Interesting fault on the mower. A Bowden cable had pulled with me trying to engage the 'clutch' or equivalent. The Bowden outer plastic had touched the exhaust pipe and melted it. This left the cable exposed to damp and the inner cable was rusted solid. The sort of thing that one can get on a Mig welder
I've freed the cable temporarily. Now to put it back together.

The offending 'funny screw that was bugging the removal of the body shell has turned out to be 5BA

Don't ask me why. I know the Italians used to put garlic in Christmas puddings but this is ridiculous.

N
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Old 05-21-2017, 10:49 PM   #17
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Hi Norman,

I'll have to remove and count the threads, on the topslide. And crosslide, these need taking off for a good clean up anyhow before I start using the lathe properly. The dials I have are what look like brass, and indexed at 80 divisions and can be turned to zero. The dials you have are most likely from an ML7.

The info that Frazer kindly sent onto me,explained that the earlier ML4 lathes had leadscrews had a 12TPI thread, with the lather lathes having a 10TPI leadscrews on the topslide and crosslide. The lathes now been put out in the shed after receiving its liberal dosage of a WD40 over everything to protect it from damp, and sheeted until I can get the bench up and it mounted.

This also leads onto another question I have about benches for the lathe.

So I have a 6x4' wooden shed,which will have a reinforced floor, (18mm OSB) with four 3x3" wooden bearers under the shed. Which should provide a solid shed In the absence of concrete flooring. In the shed as well as the lathe which measures 26" from edge of motor to front mounting feet, there will need to be provision for storing two bikes. As well as a set up for a small worktop to assemble on. Now most lathes I've seen are butt up to a wall running parallel, my thinking is (truth be told my partners 8 year old) that the lathe could be mounted diagonally across one corner of the shed, on a triangle bench top, with a small 300mm worktop running the length of one side of the shed. Tool storage been below both of these worktops. This would mean I have access to either end of the lathe and also space to move when working in the shed, a fold up extention to the bench could be added if required, supported like those fold out dining tables, with a slide out leg.

Thoughts and opinions on this please? As its in my mind the best use of the available space, the bikes would be sent outside while I was in the shed.
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Old 05-21-2017, 11:22 PM   #18
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Jon
The feed screw question was uppermost. Hence the question. Obviously your brass dials are a latter addition
As far as an 6x4 shed is concerned, it is going to be tight but so is my 8x6 with a Myford across the back, the mill drill- with a power feed and a Clarkson 1 T&C . The drill has just left. The Quorn sort of hides under the benches with bits of stuff for the Clarkie and the Universal Pillar Tool and a couple of rotary tables, a versatile dividing head etc etc.

But think! One of my old white water and sailing mates had his ML7 under the bed and my late wife's tutor in dentistry and our organist at our wedding kept a ML7 under the stairs!

The old ML that made my metering valve for my school boy jet engine was fastened to the table in the wash house.

You want a play with a snowhole in midwinter in Arctic Norway to learn what is really tight. Never eat yellow snow

One perspiring worker( friend Cleeve) drilled a hole in his shed to take bars of metal.

One of my old Rover Scouts took his watchmakers lathe to Oz on the top of his commando rucksack.

I could go on- apologies

N
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Old 05-21-2017, 11:34 PM   #19
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I put my Boxford model 'A' in the LH corner of my shed, which is only a little bigger than yours, against the long wall. I made an opening window at the back of the head stock which is a little fiddly but means I can put a long bar through the head stock or use a draw bar for a collet chuck, both when it's not raining, with the window open!

More importantly, I put another window behind the lathe and made it a 'bay window' which pokes out about 6". The deep ledge is a great place to put the counter shaft (mine is a bench model and not an under drive lathe) which means the bed can sit closer to the wall and I lose less floor space. The countershaft bracket sits on the same bench as the lathe, so there's nothing structural about the window - it's just a bit of a scrap ply box with some glass in the front. I think it makes my shed rather classy - if it wasn't dark here I'd add a picture

I'd make your bench as massive as you can, store all your heavy tools on its shelves, and bolt your lathe tight to it - the heavier everything is the less you'll vibrate and the better finish you'll get. If you can use paving slabs under the lathe bench rather than a wooden floor, it'll be better. Pouring a bit of a floor in concrete would be better still, but maybe you need to make this more temporary than that.

hope that's useful

Mark
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Old 05-22-2017, 12:19 AM   #20
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Hi Mark yes I would like to get set up to run and my house is rented, otherwise I'd be looking at building a brick shed with a concrete floor. I figure that if I can make the base of the shed, solid as I can then I'll be able to build a robust solid workbench out of 4x2's and a 38mm worktop, with a fold down extension for when I need more worktop space for assembling. That's my theory anyhow??


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