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Old 12-22-2016, 03:48 AM   #1
editor123
 
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Default Turnkey 3D Printer

Not having a lot of time on my hands and reading about the problems and time folks have had to invest to get a kit 3D printer operating, I decided to buy an already built, all-metal printer. Ouch! The prices!
Strolling through Amazon, I came across an unknown printer called the Qidi X-one. Nothing but glowing reports by users on the printer and tech. support.
So I invested $400 with Amazon on a Friday night. Sunday I received an e-mail from the Chinese manufacturer thanking me for my purchase. Monday the 46 Lb. package arrived and one hour later, after attaching handles and the filament spool holder, the43 Lb. printer turned out its first perfect print.
I've now run about 2,000 meters of filament through the printer, the longest print time being 21 hours to print a marble machine.
The printer did fail once. Again, on a Friday night and I sent a video of the failure to the manufacturer. The following Wednesday I received a new stepper motor, the tools and small parts to install it along with a how-to video and a couple of spare nozzles and build platform cover.
It is not an overlarge printer at 150 x 150 x 150 mm (5.9 x 5.9 x 5.9 inches) but it will print right up to the limits. The bed is heated and I've already printed both carbon fiber and PETG filaments, the PETG taking high temperatures on the bed and extruder. Everything in the mechanism and frame is metal in this printer. The printer is quite accurate, being off only 0.006" in the X-direction and 0.002" in the Y-direction on a 5" test square.
I've been able to make a lot of bits and pieces for the shop. Collet storage, jigs for the mill, vacuum cleaner attachment for the CNC mill, ring-lights for the Bridgeport and, of course, the marble machine.
Best of all, unlike a manual or CNC machine tool, I can walk away and let it work with no worry.
The market is getting better out there.


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Old 12-25-2016, 12:43 AM   #2
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$400 is dirt cheap! Plus the support seems to be excellent.

I need to get a 3D printer built or bought but even $400 would be hard right now. In any event tanks for the glowing report.


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Old 12-30-2016, 02:05 AM   #3
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Thanks for the review. Sounds like just what i'm looking for.

So how much kickback are you getting
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Old 12-30-2016, 05:55 PM   #4
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Good support and an occasional thank you. But then all their customers get that.
I wasn't the one who received one free for a YouTube video review. Unfortunately.
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Old 12-31-2016, 08:44 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by editor123 View Post
Good support and an occasional thank you. But then all their customers get that.
It s good to hear comments like that!
Quote:

I wasn't the one who received one free for a YouTube video review. Unfortunately.

Frankly what I'm seeing on youtube, with guys getting free stuff, has me seriously thinking about starting my own youtube service. The problem is many of these guys make the production of the videos look easy when we all know it is a lot of work.

On the other hand i really believe that the younger generation could use quality materials that introduce them to the technology worlds. I see this at work where the shop skills of new employees just suck. I mean we are talking things like not knowing the difference between a taper, plug or bottom tap. Sometimes id like to help out with this but have to question if i have an on screen persona that would actually be bearable.
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Old 01-01-2017, 04:52 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Wizard69 View Post
It s good to hear comments like that!



Frankly what I'm seeing on youtube, with guys getting free stuff, has me seriously thinking about starting my own youtube service. The problem is many of these guys make the production of the videos look easy when we all know it is a lot of work.

On the other hand i really believe that the younger generation could use quality materials that introduce them to the technology worlds. I see this at work where the shop skills of new employees just suck. I mean we are talking things like not knowing the difference between a taper, plug or bottom tap. Sometimes id like to help out with this but have to question if i have an on screen persona that would actually be bearable.
Yea, I own a video production company and the couple of 2+ hour instructional videos on operating machine tools took more than a year each to produce. My magazine, in which I strive to teach folks how to make operating model engines takes a long time to produce too. Capturing the operational experience of a machinist is difficult since most of them are not what I'd call good communicators. Must be the cutting oil fumes.
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Old 01-02-2017, 12:06 AM   #7
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Quote:
Capturing the operational experience of a machinist is difficult since most of them are not what I'd call good communicators. Must be the cutting oil fumes.
We need only to communicate with our machines. People are optional.

Mark T
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Old 01-03-2017, 04:23 PM   #8
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It does help to create new machinists since we've not:
  1. Kept apprentice programs active.
  2. Kept the high school and (many) college teaching programs open
  3. Turned most machine shops into a group of operators with maybe a few machinists
.
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Old 01-04-2017, 09:28 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by editor123 View Post
It does help to create new machinists since we've not:
  1. Kept apprentice programs active.
  2. Kept the high school and (many) college teaching programs open
  3. Turned most machine shops into a group of operators with maybe a few machinists
.

This is a huge problem across many crafts. I work automation which is closely related to machining. At this point you cant even find anybody under 55 to apply for a job. It is too the point that apprenticeships are actually being considered again.

As for high schools well there are very few anymore that really expose students to all the employment opportunities out there. Pretty sad really, a narrow minded (liberal) view of what an acceptable job is.

An interesting comment i once heard from a machine shop owner us that a decent employee comes around about once in a hundred. Hard to believe that there are that many people out there that cant tie their own shoes.
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Old 03-13-2017, 01:24 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wizard69 View Post
This is a huge problem across many crafts. I work automation which is closely related to machining. At this point you cant even find anybody under 55 to apply for a job. It is too the point that apprenticeships are actually being considered again.

As for high schools well there are very few anymore that really expose students to all the employment opportunities out there. Pretty sad really, a narrow minded (liberal) view of what an acceptable job is.

An interesting comment i once heard from a machine shop owner us that a decent employee comes around about once in a hundred. Hard to believe that there are that many people out there that cant tie their own shoes.
Here's a question for you since you seem to know what you're talking about: What would my odds be applying to a local machine shop?

My only relevant experience and education is being able to read technical drawings, but I'm more familiar with the machines and their operation than the average Joe. I'm good with Solidworks, I can remove a broken tap, I can tell you when and why you'd use 1018 vs. 301, I can weld stick, MIG and TIG. Basically I'd feel confident spending a day or so getting familiar with the machines, then being handed a drawing of a part and fabricating it.


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