Project of the Month built by driller1432

Help Support Home Model Engine Machinist by donating using the link above or becoming a Supporting Member.
Home Model Engine Machinist > The Tools and Tips > Tools > The beginners tool box

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 11-28-2012, 11:00 PM   #21
Beachside_Hank
 
Beachside_Hank's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: PALM BAY FL
Posts: 71
Liked 27 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 23

Default

Troy O submitted a good tip: Graph Paper. This site lets you download your own custom sized grids for printing at home.


__________________
- Beachside Hank
Improvise, Adapt, Overcome; the essence of true craftsmanship.
Beachside_Hank is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2012, 12:29 AM   #22
Tin Falcon
HMEM_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Tin Falcon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: down Jersey USA
Posts: 7,212
Liked 814 Times on 647 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default Hole Guages



http://www.littlemachineshop.com/pro...3184&category=

these T Gauges or telescoping gauges are used to gauge an inside diameter. the measurement is then taken with a micrometer. I showed the pec brand made in USA and half the price of starrett . my favorite set is a used starrett set of four.


IMHO the small set has plenty of range for models.

the technique with these is make the T smaller than the hole. set it at an angle slightly off perpendicular and release the slide so it extends sug slightly then rock the tool the tor slide will compress to the size of the hole . lock the slide in place and measure. this does take some practice.


smaller holes need smaller gauges. like these


or these

these expand in the hole untill you feel drag when moving the gauge.
many brands to choose from but make sure the tools adjust smoothly .

IMHO the ones from harbor freight have too rough of a finish on the T gauges for my taste. I would not trust them for consistent and accurate measurements. Mileage may vary ......

Again this is a tool I leaned to use in USAF tech school.
All photos are from Littlemachineshop.com
Tin


__________________
Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus
Amat victoria praeparatio diligens
Tin Falcon is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2012, 02:44 AM   #23
idahoan
 
idahoan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Boise, Idaho
Posts: 556
Liked 189 Times on 101 Posts
Likes Given: 59

Default

Two of my favorites; both available from Little Machine Shop.

The Tapping block;


http://littlemachineshop.com/product...ProductID=2571

And the the tap guide;



http://littlemachineshop.com/product...1963&category=

Both of these items are proudly made in the USA and are quite handy. I use both of them in my day job and also in my home shop.

Dave
idahoan is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2012, 02:56 AM   #24
Tin Falcon
HMEM_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Tin Falcon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: down Jersey USA
Posts: 7,212
Liked 814 Times on 647 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default

Quote:
I hope that is still in keeping with the spirit of the thread!
No problem Troy all good ideas many I would not thought of posting here. and not something IN my tool box.

also the full copy of older editions of the machinery Handbook can be had cheaper than the latest and greatest. They are used as college text books so used copies are available.

I like the Poster size markers for layout dye.

The reason I set the guidelines I did was to try to keep things realistic as far as filling a beginners tool box and encourage maximum participation and not have one or two guys fill the box with tools. like I said guidelines. I want this to be fun for as many people as want to get involved.
Tin
__________________
Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus
Amat victoria praeparatio diligens
Tin Falcon is offline  
robcas631 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2012, 02:56 AM   #25
thayer
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 207
Liked 85 Times on 59 Posts
Likes Given: 20

Default

Why I was using my .400-.500 gauge and my 0-1" micrometer just last night as I bored the cylinders for a couple of new Elmer's engines. That's new to me, by the way. I haven't found Elmer's lost archives.

A lot of folks have mentioned using cigarette papers to find zero as they touch off a tool. They are getting harder to find, but a good substitute and perhaps just as bad for your health are plastic wrappers from "penny" candy. I personally prefer the clear wrapper from the grape or raspberry Jolly Ranchers with results from the watermelon and apple wrappers almost as accurate. I can't get a decent read off the cherry ones to save my life. I suspect many other brands will do as well. Mic the wrapper of your choice after tossing the contents in the bin. I find they are usually right at .001. The clear areas let you see the stock as you get close and I find a little concentrated back light lets me see pretty well when the tool is about to touch down. Keeping a small box of unused JR wrappers also helps ensure my 9-year-old makes it into the shop reasonably often. He had a lot of fun helping me clock in the cylinder blocks in the 4-jaw and determine the offset with my drop indicator mounted on the lathe cross slide.

Speaking of dedicated tool lights, I really like the Jansjo LED work lamps from Ikea. At $10 per, they are worth scattering around the shop. I mounted on to the ceiling joist above my drill press and plugged it into the switched circuit also overhead (remember the 9-year-old?). Whenever I want to use the drill press the light comes on with the power and reminds me to turn off the circuit at the end of the evening. I also have others mounted near my scroll saw and disk sander, so the waist level switch drives the lamp, tool and shop vac. Yes, the boy is checked out on those.

Attached are stock images from Jolly Rancher and Ikea with a link for more info on the lamp.

Thayer

http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/20169658/

Attached Thumbnails
jolly_ranchers_bulk.jpg  

Last edited by thayer; 11-29-2012 at 03:11 AM.
thayer is offline  
3
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2012, 09:16 PM   #26
TroyO
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 231
Liked 32 Times on 23 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tin Falcon View Post
also the full copy of older editions of the machinery Handbook can be had cheaper than the latest and greatest. They are used as college text books so used copies are available.
That's exactly what I did.... I want to say I got it for ~$30, it was several editions behind and from the early 80's, which matters absolutely naught as my machining equipment uses absolutely no technology that wasn't available by the early 60's, (1860's?) LOL.
TroyO is offline  
robcas631 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2012, 11:25 PM   #27
Tin Falcon
HMEM_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Tin Falcon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: down Jersey USA
Posts: 7,212
Liked 814 Times on 647 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default

I have several copies of the Machinery Handbook.
My first one is a copy of the 13th edition post ww 2 1948 I think. when I completed USAF tech school I decided I needed a current copy so purchased a 25 edition from Enco. Later I purchased tool box full of tools including a 22nd edition. And I have digital copies of the 1st/3rd edition and 11th. available on internet archive and can be loaded on a tablet. The latest to the collection is a hard copy of the 1st 1915 edition. I also have a couple of the guide books.
and I put a copy of the 25 th edition in my sons tool box.
25th Edition can be had for under $30
Tin
__________________
Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus
Amat victoria praeparatio diligens
Tin Falcon is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2012, 12:02 AM   #28
johnmcc69
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 140
Liked 18 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 21

Default

Hmmmmmm...beginners tools..
How about this place? HMEM. A great beginners tool.
Years upon years of experience here, friendly folks
To answer ANY questions you may have, advice, best practices,
Tips, tricks, free build plans...

Oh yeah, drill & tap charts, in inch & metric.

John
johnmcc69 is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2012, 12:49 AM   #29
_shadow_
 
_shadow_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 14
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Fantastic thread! Subscribed.

Regards
_shadow_ is offline  
robcas631 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2013, 12:34 PM   #30
Tin Falcon
HMEM_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Tin Falcon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: down Jersey USA
Posts: 7,212
Liked 814 Times on 647 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default

I posted these in hole layout 101 here are a few valuable layout tools



you NEED two finished edges that are perpendicular (square) to each other. use a poster marker to dye the part.




scribe lines with one of these.

sitting on a granite surface plate and resting against


Once all lines are scribed use an optical center punch to punch centers of the holes.

Above photo grizzly tools
Then center punch with one of these:


photo HF tools

Then drill with a thin drill bit like 1/16 this will follow the punch mark. then with a spot drill . the a pilot drill and finish drill .
Hope this helps.


for bolt circles I like a 6 hole cirlce it so happens that the radius of the circle and the cord distance between holes is the same. Uese the humble diver to lay out.



or you can use the above method to lay out after converting from polar to rectangular coordinates. This can be done with math or consulting the machinery handbook.
Hope this helps
tin
And guys there is still room in the tool box so feel free to add to the box.


__________________
Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus
Amat victoria praeparatio diligens
Tin Falcon is offline  
3
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
beginners questions Atzerath General Engine Discussion 4 08-11-2012 07:55 AM
Easy CNC A beginners guide to CNC Bill Gruby General Engine Discussion 14 03-01-2011 09:50 PM
Reamers for beginners.... MattB General Engine Discussion 2 11-29-2009 07:31 PM
Beginners Resource kustomkb The Break Room 0 11-06-2009 04:19 PM
Stirling Engine for beginners BMyers Plans 1 02-13-2008 10:55 PM



Newest Threads






- Top - Member List