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Home Model Engine Machinist > Building Them > Mistakes, Blunders and Boo Boos > Lathe accident, Tool organizer, bad idea.

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Old 12-09-2012, 11:35 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Scota4570 View Post
A good friend hurt himself very badly. He has many many years of experience as a machinist and gunsmith. He has a wonderfull shop.

The machine is a big Lablond, 15x56 or there abouts. He has a phase changer in the shop to run it.

He made a magnetic system to hold his lathe tool holders. It was located behind the lathe and above. He was making a cut and reached over the spindle to put a tool away. The work was rough enough to grab his sleeve. The work wound his arm up around it several times. It pulled his head down to the chuck and cut off part of his ear. Just then the circut breaker kicked off. If he had been running faster the inerta would have killed him. If running slower the torque would have killed him.

Finding himself alone and wrapped up in the machine he was able to kick the clutch petal and unwind himself. He was able to call 911 and get help.

He had several compound fractures of the bones in his arm and his hand was mangled. This thumb is ruined. The arm healed up pretty well. Modern medicine amazes me. He is still getting around and making lots of great projects and having fun.

Gads, It makes me queasy to write this.
LeBlonde Lathes.

I bought two LeBlonde Precision Lathes for the Singapore compressor plant.Proud to say were made in Singapore by LeBlonde Singapore. Leblonde Singapore Plant was later sold to Makino,Japan.They make CNC Machine Centres. FMS n FMC etc.
These were the best lathe I ever had. Will take very light cuts and gives good finishing basis the right cutter and feed rate and rpm.


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Old 12-09-2012, 11:40 AM   #22
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Way back in 1961,a school mate and later work mate had his index finger chopped while holding on to the chuck key while starting up the lathe. The trade school had a hard time convincing his parents and the Ministries for Education and Labour of no foul play or neglect etc.

Was a very painful accident.


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Old 12-27-2012, 03:28 PM   #23
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I am a newbie as far as machining goes. I am a IT guy with extensive volunteer emergency service experience. Getting older every year like all the members on the site. Age is a risk factor, you do not get away with what you used to 20 years ago. When you look at burns in elderly female patients especially they early morning cooking fire or night elderly ladies are not fast enough to pullout a burning petty coat especially with buttons rather use snaps. Males, you don't see young guys getting burned refueling a running lawn mower they can get their pants of fast enough.. Another member said safety is a continuous effort I have to agree with him 100%. Most people don't think it will happen to them That's you without the $20 fire extinguisher and no shop first aid kit.

Accidents happen in an instant and for everyone looking back it was a stupid idea does not imply that they are...
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Old 01-19-2013, 10:23 PM   #24
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I am new to machining but not new to being injured doing stuff less than the best possible way. I have been lucky more times than I can count. I have developed a theory hat has led me to a practice that has served me well. I believe that prior to most accidents that there was a warning, however small, something akin to a near miss. I now pay lose attention to ANYTHING that doesn't go quite the way I thought it would and step back, take a break and rethink the situation. I ask myself, am I tired? Do I have the right tool? (etc. , etc.) And if the near miss is serious, I walk away and leave it for another day. Yes, things need to get done but I have a "no hospital trips" policy these days and I find I even get fewer minor injuries using this approach.
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Old 01-20-2013, 12:43 AM   #25
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...Grab the chuck key ( suspended by a counterweight above and left of the headstock).
I love this idea. I'm going to do it.
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Old 01-20-2013, 12:55 AM   #26
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Wow! I am very sorry to hear about your friend! When when I got my lathe I heeded the advice enclosed in the directions. Then I watched a few lathe videos regarding safety. I went so far as to remove my wedding ring and watch. I established good working habits. I may have a mini lathe but I respect it!
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Old 01-20-2013, 02:01 AM   #27
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Default Ouch...

One rule for a lathe is don't be reaching over a moving chuck. I have worked with chicks with just the corner of a jaw hanging out. I know what they feel like when the chuck is not moving, I can only imagine waht they feel like when the chuck is moving...
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Old 01-20-2013, 03:40 AM   #28
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I have worked with chicks with just the corner of a jaw hanging out.
Yeah, we have some strange looking women where I work too.
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Old 01-22-2013, 04:26 AM   #29
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Thanks Scota4570,
Stories like that make my guts churn,but they do help reinforce safety,and so,should be told.One thing i recently overlooked was eye protection while grinding.I didnt know at the time,but i recieved a small fragment of mild steel in the eye,that was gritty feeling and i thought would just go away,it got worse and started rusting.So i had a weeping eye for about a month and several sessions at the eye specialist to get it ground out with a micro die grinder and a bit called an alger burr.I was lucky as it missed my pupil only just.It felt very uncomfortable..Remember to protect them eyes everyone.I have always wore prescription glasses,but got into a bad habit of looking over the top of the frames when working close.Now i have 'safety' glasses stationed at every piece of machinery in the shop.
I only started my mini lathe once when it was new with the chuck key still in the chuck.Now every chuck key in the shop has bright red tape wrapped all over them.It helps identify them on the bench or in the chuck.Since then i have never started the lathe with the key still in.
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Old 01-22-2013, 05:21 AM   #30
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A real good friend of mine decided to go into work early to get ahead of his day at the machine shop. Experienced guy, he was in his early 40s then, and he had been machining since he was in high school. Long sleeve shirt, wrapped up in the chuck of a BIG engine lathe. He wrapped his arm around the work three times before he could hit the safety stop. I have no idea how he got his arm out, I don't see how it was possible. Good news is that he survived, but man that arm was a mess, and it still is, but they saved it. I would love to meet the surgeon, but not on a professional basis. Use common sense with any of this stuff. I run a lathe that can swing a two foot part in the gap of the bed, and I stay respectful of it. I think about my buddy a lot when I run my lathe.


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